GFWC LEADS
(
Leadership Education and Development Seminar)

 
GFWC PENNSYLVANIA LEADERSHIP CHAIRMAN
Dawn L. Himler, 458 Himler Road
Greensburg, PA 15601-6322
724-836-3764 or dhimler@comcast.net
   
DISTRICT CHAIRMAN
Northeastern District
Linda Young
306 Huston Street
Clarks Summit, PA 18411-1524
570-586-5809
103young@comcast.net
North Central District
Joyce Kerr
467 Orlando Avenue
State College, PA 16803-3477
814-237-4755
dxk7@psu.edu

 

Northwestern District
Susan Wingard
93 Mary Lane
Curwensville, PA 16833
814-236-1571
susanwingard@verizon.net
Southeastern District
Barbara Hartenbauer
605 Centennial Street
Schwenksville, PA 19473
601-287-7010
barbaraorganist@gmail.com
South Central District
Carol Bogar
106 Brindle Road
Mechanicsburg, PA 17055-9780
717-697-8922
cbogar@bogarlaw.com
Southwestern District
Kathie Strait
460 Wilbur Avenue
Turtle Creek, PA 15145-1328
412-824-0993
Kstrait1@hotmail.com
   

LEADERSHIP

Carolyn Smith carolyns411@embarqmail.com 6 N. Riverview Ave,
Columbia, N J 07832 908-475-5627

Co-Chairman-Dottie Sawyer Victorian.65@verizon.net  1628 Erie Court
Effort PA  18330

eagleENERGIZING MEMBERS


How does your club “feel?”  Is it full of energy or is it just creeping along?  Is it growing or has it become stagnant?  How your organization feels is just as important as all the manuals, policies, job descriptions and rewards combined.  Members don’t stay in your organization because of the great operational manuals but because they feel productive, satisfied and committed to the goals.
Norms, unwritten rules of any group, create the four dimensions of climate that determine the “feel” of your organization: energy, distribution of energy, pleasure or satisfaction and growth.  By examining each of these dimensions, leaders can determine what the climate of their club is:

 

  • ENERGY- Energy is defined as the force used in your club.  This can either be low or high.  LOW energy translates into the same routine year after year after year.  Members feel uninvolved and that they are not an important part of the group.  HIGH energy translates into competitiveness, excitement, working together toward a common goal.  Members feel they are valuable and important.

  • DISTRIBUTION OF ENERGY – Distribution of Energy is defined as the choices people make as to where they will use their energies.  Ask these questions:  Are you just surviving or are you risk taking?  Do you follow old procedures or are you inventing new and better ways of doing things?  Is it short-term productivity or is it long-term development?

  • PLEASURE OR SATISFACTION –Pleasure is defined as the good feeling you get when accomplishing something.  Do members find it pleasurable to attend meetings or is it a real grind?  Are meetings enjoyable or are they there because they were coerced into attending?  Do the members feel comfortable wanting to return again and again?

  • GROWTH – Growth is defined as the personal development of the members.  Are members’ skills and abilities recognized?  Is there room and opportunity to develop new programs or projects or hone old ones?  Can new projects be discussed and developed?  Is change encouraged or fought?
To keep your club ENERGIZED, why not try some of the following Energizing Tips:
  • Have a “Bright Idea” segment at each Club meeting or an article in the club newsletter.  Topics can include Public Speaking, Time Management, Goal Setting, Facilitating and Listening, and/or Coaching or Mentoring.  If you do this at a club meeting limit the time to 5 minutes and rotate facilitating among the club members.

  • Award a “Leader of the Month” certificate to recognize an exceptional amount of time and energy given for the good of the club.

  • Have established club leaders share “What I Never Knew About Myself” until I became a leader.

  • Make sure all members have a POSITIVE MENTAL ATTITUDE.  Fine anyone who expresses a negative thought $.25 and put the money towards one of your projects.

  • Start a club leadership lending library to include books, articles, newsletters and other resources on leadership.

  • Recognize and reward individual contributions at every opportunity.  Balloons, trophies, flowers, certificates, thank you notes or fuzzy grams are some examples.

  • Create ways to recognize ideas from your general membership.  Try a “Great Idea of the Month” award.

  • Donate a book on Leadership to your local library in honor of your club president.

  • Hold a “You Deserve a Break” meeting where the Vice President presides and the President sits out with the membership.

  • Give recognition to members for their accomplishments outside the club as well as within the club.  Implement annual awards for years of service, perfect attendance, volunteering in the community, etc.

  • Reevaluate some of your standard projects and programs.  If they are not still effective get rid of them by holding a “Funeral” for those projects that need burned and disposed of.

  • Try at least ONE new project a year.

Remember there should be a genuine interest, energy and enthusiasm for the goals of the club with the Leader communicating that interest, energy and enthusiasm.
“OWL” leave you with this thought by an unknown author: “Your creativity lies only a few minutes away from you thinking, so stop thinking.”


LEADS CRITERIA

Have you thought about taking on a Leadership position at the state level?  Are you not sure if you are qualified?  Have you thought about applying for the GFWC LEADS (Leadership Education and Development) Seminar?  Here is the listing of the GFWC Pennsylvania LEADS candidate criteria:
  • Demonstrates leadership capabilities at the club level as an active club president, club officer, or club project or committee chairman.
  • Exhibits a commitment to the Federation.
  • Exhibits an understanding of the GFWC mission of community service, illustrated by programs and projects in which she is or has been involved.
  • Demonstrates leadership skills, including, but not limited to, organization, responsibility, trustworthiness, enthusiasm, and flexibility.
  • Exhibits an interest in and willingness to pursue higher leadership positions in GFWC.
  • Agrees to share information gained from participation in LEADS with others in the state federation.
  • Understands and accepts potential expenses involved in participation.
  • Has not held elected positions at or beyond the state level (this criterion is recommended in order to encourage potential leaders at the club level to apply).
  • Has not attended a previous LEADS programs.  Members are eligible to attend only once.

If you answered “YES” to the above, you are eligible to apply as the GFWC Pennsylvania 2018 candidate.
Send the attached LEADS application form, along with two letters of support from active GFWC club members postmarked by:
February 1, 2018
Send completed application and letters to:
Dawn L. Himler, 458 Himler Road, Greensburg, PA 15601-6322
If you have any questions you may email Dawn at dhimler@comcast.net or phone at 723-836-3764.


 
© 2016 General Federation of Women’s Clubs Pennsylvania.  All rights reserved.  Permission granted to GFWC Pennsylvania members for their exclusive use to freely reproduce in whole or in part (indicate if excerpted) using this credit line: © 2016 General Federation of Women’s Clubs Pennsylvania.  717-901-5095 www.gfwcpennsylvania.org.  Used with permission.  May not be reproduced for sale or profit.


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